Grants


Dr. Kumer Das and Dr. Dale Daniel of Mathematics,and Dr. Stefan Andrei and Dr. Lawrence Osborne received a research grant from the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation has awarded Lamar University a grant of more than $550,000 to support The ASCENT program which provides scholarships for students majoring in Computer Science and Mathematics who have completed their first two years of work with at least a 3.0 GPA and who are eligible for financial aid. Community college transfer students are encouraged to apply as well as those students who have been attending Lamar. The Principal Investigator of ASCENT is Dr. Kumer Das in the Department of Mathematics, and the Co-Principal Investigators are Dr. Stefan Andrei (Computer Science), Dr. Dale Daniel (Mathematics), and Dr. Lawrence Osborne (Computer Science.)
The scholarships are worth as much as $10,000 per year. In addition to faculty mentoring, students will be supported by peer mentoring, career education information, and additional summer research opportunities. This summer 8 undergraduate students were selected to begin the program. They took a class in Graph Theory taught by Dr. Dale Daniel to enhance their understanding of discrete mathematics, a necessary component for both pure mathematics and computer science.

NSF Research Project #0917257 Efficient Groebner Basis Computation in Boolean Rings for Temporal Logic Reasoning and Model Checking:
Dr. Quoc-Nam Tran has received another NSF research project to support his current research on Algorithmic Foundations of Computer Science. This time, Dr. Tran and Dr. V. Andreev from Maths Department received $220,645 for doing research on Groebner Bases in the next 3 years. The method of Groebner bases has become one of the most important techniques in providing an exact solution of nonlinear problems in multivariate polynomial ideal theory, computational algebra and elimination theory, in solving systems of algebraic equations, and in many other related areas. It is also being fruitfully used in a variety of seemingly unrelated research areas such as geometric theorem proving, integer programming, solid modeling, and engineering. This project will develop the theories and algorithms for an efficient framework of PSPACE Groebner basis computation in Boolean rings and then apply this framework to temporal logic reasoning and model checking. The theoretical and algorithmic results of this research should have a broader impact on symbolic computation, temporal logic reasoning and related areas such as automated verification of hardware and software in model checking. Symbolic computation is an active and rich area with enormous activity and progress in the last twenty years. A new approach to temporal logic reasoning and model checking making use of results from symbolic computation seems to have considerable promise, both as a supplement to existing methods and as a way to bring a large body of powerful mathematical machinery to bear on the model checking problem.

Dr. Bo Sun, Dr. Kami Makki, and Dr. Lawrence Osborne have received a grant from National Science Foundation
"Dr. Bo Sun, Dr. Kami Makki, and Dr. Lawrence Osborne have received a $182,363 National Science Foundation grant entitled "Acquisition of Equipment to Develop an Energy Efficient and Reliable Wireless Sensor Network for Urban Landscape Irrigation Management System". The goal of this project is to design and implement an energy efficient and reliable Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) for Urban Landscape Irrigation Management System (ULIMS). The constructed WSN will consist of the design and implementation of a long-lived, real-time, reliable network with remote control capability. We will design and implement an optimized routing protocol, a data collection protocol, and a data dissemination protocol. These protocols will enable the accurate real-time data collection using WSNs for site-specific irrigation systems."

Dr. Kami Makki has received a grant from NSF for starting an REU SITE
"Dr. Kami Makki has received a grant for $314,997 from NSF for starting an REU SITE at Lamar University. This REU Site grant provides a unique opportunity for undergraduate students to perform supervised research and obtain rich experiences in a diverse and multicultural environment. The staring date is summer 2009."

Dr. Kami Makki has received a grant from NSF for research on sensor networks
"Dr. Kami Makki has received a grant for $49,823 from NSF for research on sensor networks. This project provides opportunity for both graduate and undergraduate students to perform research and obtain experience in sensor network. The starting date is fall 2008. "

National Science Foundation grant for STAIRSTEP project
"Dr. Peggy Doerschuk and her colleagues, Dr. Cristian Bahrim, Dr. Jennifer Daniel, Dr. Joe Kruger, Dr. Judith Mann, and Dr. Christopher Martin, have received a four-year grant for $ 800,000 from NSF for the STAIRSTEP project (STudents Advancing through Involvement in Research Student Talent Expansion Program). STAIRSTEP is designed to increase the number of talented at risk undergraduate students receiving baccalaureate degrees in Computer Science, Physics, Mathematics, Geology, Earth Science, and Chemistry. The start date is January 1, 2009."

" National Science Foundation grant entitled "Module-based Courseware and Laboratory Development for Teaching Secure Wireless Sensor Networks" - Dr. Bo Sun and Dr. Lawrence Osborne
"Dr. Bo Sun and Dr. Lawrence Osborne have received a $71,324 National Science Foundation grant entitled "Module-based Courseware and Laboratory Development for Teaching Secure Wireless Sensor Networks". The goal of this program is to develop a set of modules to teach students the fundamentals of secure wireless sensor networking. A testbed for wireless sensor networking will be set up in the Department of Computer Science at Lamar University. This testbed will enable students to develop, deploy, and test interesting projects. Funding will support the program for two years. "

The National Science Foundation Grant for INSPIRED Program
The National Science Foundation has awarded Lamar University a $490,000 grant to support its "Increasing Student Participation in Research Development" - INSPIRED - program. The goal of the program is to demonstrate that by using INSPIRED strategies schools can increase the number of women and minorities getting computing degrees to help meet the growing demand for talented professionals in the field of computer science.

Strategies for INSPIRED include engaging students in an enriched research plan with tutoring, mentoring and peer support; helping students bridge to advanced study or careers in computing; dispelling misconceptions about computer science that discourage participation of women and minorities; and engaging INSPIRED students in outreach programs for under-represented middle and high school students.

Funding will support the program for three years, beginning Sept. 1, 2007. Computer Science Professor Dr. Peggy Doerschuk and Assistant Professor Dr. Jiangjiang Liu will direct the activities of the INSPIRED Program, and Psychology Assistant Professor Judith Mann will direct the assessment of the INSPIRED Program.


Dr. Bo Sun - "Secure Aggregation for Large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks

Dr. Bo Sun received a grant for "Secure Aggregation for Large-scale Wireless Sensor Networks" from theTexas Advanced Research Program (ARP)

Amount:$48,781

Project Description:

This project aims at designing a lightweight and effective Wireless Sensor Network Intrusion Detection System (WSNIDS) to detect malicious behaviors exhibited by compromised sensor nodes in large-scale WSNs.